Derek Boshier

Boshier, Derek Born 1937 Derek Boshier, born in Portsmouth, England in 1937 attended the Royal college of art in London, alongside David Hockney, Allen Jones and Peter Phillips, graduating in 1962. During his college years his work was didactic, commenting on the space race, the all-powerful multinationals and the increasing Americanisation of English culture. He appeared with Peter Blake, Pauline Boty and Peter Phillips in Pop Goes the Easel (1962), a film by Ken Russell for the BBC’s Monitor series. Boshier later played the role of John Everett Millais in Russell’s television film Dante’s Inferno. Never one to allow his message to be governed by any particular medium, at the 1964 The New Generation show at the Whitechapel Gallery he exhibited large shaped canvases with vibrant areas of evenly applied colour. After 1966 he has used metal, coloured plastics, even neon light, the materials of the commercial sign maker, to create three-dimensional objects. Also he has experimented both with books and film. During the early 1970s Boshier taught at Central School of Art and Design where one of his pupils was Joe Strummer of The Clash. This led to Boshier designing The Clash’s second song book. He also worked on designs for David Bowie most notably the ‘falling figure’ the album cover for ‘The lodger’. Social commentary has once more become a major element of his work tackling head on subjects that have strong political overtones such as gun control, police brutality and once again, the...

Hugo Lugo

Lugo, Hugo Born 1974 Hugo Lugo was born in 1974 in Los Mochis Sin, Mexico, his work is at the cross-points of drawing, painting and photography. His interest lies in where experiences are difficult to explain and usually involve an ethical dilemma. His initial approach to art was marked by scenes of posters and replicas of genre paintings like landscapes and still life. ‘From this I think stems the underlying comment on the ‘sublime’ and the pictorial legacy of Romanticism that is somehow present in my work, where subjects fall into the background, allowing the center of attention to move away from them, and into the vast remainder of the scene’. His work elaborates on two main aspects of human nature: the idea of subject as a representation, and representation itself. His work has been shown in Caracas, Amsterdam, Paris, Mexico City, Bogotá, Hong Kong, Rio de Janeiro and Singapore. His awards include the Mexican Young Creator´s Grant, the National Young Artists Award, and more recently 1st prize at Rufino Tamayo´s Museum of Contemporary Art...

Cindy Sherman

Sherman, Cindy Born 1954 American photographer Cindy Sherman is known for her elaborately “disguised” self-portraits that focus on social role-playing and sexual stereotypes. Cindy Sherman was born January 19th, 1954 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey. In 1977, she began work on “Complete Untitled Film Stills”, a series of 69 photographs and one of her best-known works; her black-and-white photographs challenged cultural stereotypes promoted by the media. In the 1980s, Sherman used color film and large prints, and focused more on lighting and facial expression. She returned to ironic commentary in the 1990s, directing the dark comedy Office Killer in 1997. Three years later in 2000, she released a series of photographs of women with exaggerated attributes—a representation of social role-playing and sexual stereotypes. She is without doubt one of the most important contemporary artists and sexual/social commentators of our...

Nick Walker

Walker, Nick Born 1969 Born in Bristol in 1969, Nick Walker is an established graffiti artist. He is credited with being part of the Stencil Graffiti movement that Robert Del Naja of the Bristol trip/hop group Massive Attack, started in the 1980s, which was a major influence on Banksy (Or are Robert de Naja and Banksy one and the same?). Walker was commissioned by film director Stanley Kubrick to recreate the graffiti on the streets of New York for his film Eyes Wide Shut, starring Tom Cruise. Walker was a main participant in the 2011 ‘See No Evil’ event in Bristol, where he painted “perhaps the most striking piece at the event”, one of his bowler-hatted gentleman (a ubiquitous theme by Walker) on the side of a tower block in Nelson Street. His bowler hatted ‘vandal’ was even featured in a video by the Black Eyed Peas. Nick Walker was the first artist-in-residence of the Quin Arts programme at the Quin hotel in New York City. He created 15 original pieces on-site for the Quin’s permanent collection during his residency in 2013. In 2016, Walker revisited the Quin to showcase both historic images, as well as a new work. This solo exhibition, curated by DK Johnston, presented 25 original works and opened the hotel’s arts programme for...

Ravi Zupa

Zupa, Ravi Born 1977 Born in 1977, based in Denver Colorado, Self-taught, multi-disciplinary artist Ravi Zupa has held jobs as an animator and elementary school art teacher; his work, which often includes recycled media like maps and letters, is precisely rendered and wildly inventive. Taking cues from German Renaissance portraiture and Japanese woodblock prints, Zupa’s figures can be awkwardly posed and depicted from a slightly off-kilter perspective. In one painting, a sort of update on the “artist in his studio” trope, a figure sits at a desk where a computer monitor takes the place of an easel—hanging dogs, peasants, and a sprouting human heart emerge from the workspace. Zupa has exhibited extensively in his hometown of Denver, as well as cities across the globe—from London to Copenhagen to Mexico...

Maja Berezowska

Berezowska, Maja 1893-1978 Maja Berezowska (born 13 April 1893 or 1898 in Baranowicze – 31 May 1978 in Warsaw) was a Polish painter. From 1933 to 1936 she lived in Paris and worked with magazines such as “Le Figaro”, “Le Rire” and “Ici Paris”. She made a few caricature cartoons of Adolf Hitler which resulted in the official protest of the German Embassy in Paris, which sued Berezowska. She appeared in court but escaped having to pay any fine. However, Nazi Germans remembered her “outrage”. After her return to Poland and the outbreak of World War II she was imprisoned at Pawiak, and later given the death sentence and sent to Ravensbrück concentration camp. After the liberation of the Ravensbrück camp by the Soviet forces she left, with a group of other Polish women, first for Stockholm and a year later, in 1946, returned to her native...